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Sunset Years


Don’t you love this May 1938 cover of Sunset magazine? It heralded the venerable Western Living mag’s 40th anniversary, hence the nostalgic image of a 19th-century train engine. The clean typography and bright colors actually give it quite the contemporary feel – which was definitely in line with what Sunset has always been about. Enough with the memories, it says, let’s go out into the sunshine – and build a patio! From this particular cover, I get a distinct, forward-looking Disneyland Frontierland/Main Street U.S.A./Americana vibe. That’s the main reason why it was posted today at 4 Color Cowboy.

Since my mom had a Sunset subscription in the late ’70s and early ’80s, I grew up with some pleasant times browsing through the mag’s staid yet comfortable images of flowers, cacti, salads, and blissed-out people lounging around on their groovy outdoor, multi-tiered wooden decks. Looking at the covers from that period now, I’m astonished by the color and the simple, restrained layouts (AND they use my all-time fave font, Clarendon). Sunset has had a pretty amazing history – their main office even survived the 1906 San Francisco earthquake to rebuild anew. What a metaphor for Western perseverance! Although it’s still hanging in there – as a watered-down, Martha Stewartish lifestyle publication owned by Time Warner – Sunset‘s 1932-83 period is where it truly excelled as a primer on casual Western living. The covers shown below demonstrate just a part of what made it such a unique icon in publishing history.

Sunset, August 1932.

Sunset, October 1935.

Sunset, April 1937.

Sunset, May 1941.

Sunset, October 1949.

Sunset, October 1957.

Sunset, February 1966.

Sunset, February 1970.

Sunset, February 1972.

Sunset, June 1974.

Sunset, March 1983.

Czech Western Parody: A Brief Guide

Jiri Trnka – The Song of the Prairie (Arie Prerie) (1948)

I’m coming up with some interesting stuff to share at 4 Color Cowboy. The Song of the Prairie, a 1948 Western operetta parody from Czech animator Jiri Trnka, is one of them. A charmingly stylized tale of a cowboy serenading a lovely maiden while the black-hatted villain wreaks havoc, this stop-motion short film is similar in style to the George Pal Puppetoons. The 20-minute film isn’t available on DVD, but it can be viewed here. Even digitized on a computer screen, the animation and character designs amaze.

Although obscure in the U.S., Song of the Prairie is apparently a cherished classic in its homeland (similar, I imagine, to what we feel about the Rankin-Bass animated TV specials). The song warbled by the cowboy in this film became so popular, in fact, that it was reprised in another Czech Western parody, the 1964 live action musical Limonádový Joe aneb Konská Opera, a.k.a. Lemonade Joe. This film has its own adherents, especially considering that its broad, subversive take on Western clichés came along a decade before Mel Brooks’ Blazing Saddles. At 4 Color Cowboy, I assembled a bunch of poster designs that show how Lemonade Joe was sold throughout Europe and in the U.S. Based on the fun, cartoony images on those posters alone, I’d so love to seek this one out.